A Crack in Everything

Last Sunday at church hearing this reading got me thinking…

ANTHEM    by Leonard Cohen

The birds they sing
At the break of day
“Start again”, I heard them say
Don’t dwell
On what has passed away
Or what is yet to be.

Yeah, the war’s they will be fought again
The holy dove, she will be caught again
Bought, sold, and bought again
The dove is never free.

Ring the bell that still can ring
Forget your perfect offering
There’s a crack, a crack, in everything
That’s how the light gets in.

We ask for signs,
The signs were sent
The birth betrayed, the marriage spent
The widowhood of every government
Signs for all to see

I can run no more with that godless crowd
While the killers in high places say their prayers out loud
They have summoned up, summoned up, a thundercloud
And they’ll hear from me

Ring the bell…

You can add up the parts
You won’t have the sum
You can strike up the march
There is no drum
To every heart, every heart, love will come
But like a refugee

Ring the bell…

Last Sunday a guest speaker who is a poet and a theologian took us into the depths of faith that exists in the midst of darkness.  He used this reading/song by Leonard Cohen as the scripture. Cohen was a contemplative and an evolutionary thinker.  He understood the unity of everything in such a way that paradox was the mystery where God becomes visible. Two ideas that are poles apart come together in the present moment.  It is a mystery that reveals the holy presence of God.  This was the perfect introduction to Advent for me.  The paradox is: Christ has come and Christ is coming and in this moment, we embrace both realities.  Christ is here, yet still coming.  We have the ancient record and we have our own experience of the one who has come, but sometimes we experience the absence of God and are in the dark looking forward to Christ’s coming again.

The first verse of Anthem speaks of the process of entering life again today.  “Don’t dwell on what has passed away or what is yet to be.”  He doesn’t say ignore the past.  In fact, faith is a celebration, a remembering of what has been; and it is also a promise, a hope, a vision of what is yet to be.  Hold these but do not dwell on them.  Because just when you think you get it, he says “…the war’s they will be fought again, the holy dove, she will be caught again, bought, sold and bought again.”  I think we do buy into wishful thinking, or is it a teaching, that if we have enough faith, if we get it right, everything will be good again and it will stay that way forevermore.  And then we get disappointed and angry when our world shifts again.  Our faith is fluid and flexible and messy.  And when the crack appears it is revelation and we understand that Christ is here in us right now. Continue reading

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My Road to “No”

The City of Calgary began an exploration process in July 2016 to assess the risks and benefits of hosting the 2026 Winter Olympics.  October 2017 began a dialogue process to flesh out the way forward in getting government partners and evaluating public support.  January 2018 there was a push to support the games and get city council approval to make a formal bid by January 2019.  The bid failed to spark the vision of greatness and celebration that would get the support of the citizens of Calgary.  There was a huge discussion and negotiation process that led to a public vote this past week when Calgarians voted to not go ahead with an Olympic bid.

I got caught up in this process early because I have always been glued to the tube watching the Olympics.  My daughter was a mascot in the 1988 Olympics and I have great memories of what Calgary was able to do.  I was generally positive in support of the bid.  I kept up with the progress reports and assumed that council would make the right decision in time. In the past 8 months I found myself on the fence as the process continued and more questions emerged about the finances.  The Alberta economy played an important role for many people with both positive and negative influences.  The Olympics were put forward as a way to renew the Alberta economy, show the world what we could do, fill empty office space in downtown Calgary, refurbish aging sport infrastructure, and give us and the world a positive vision of Calgary as a forward-looking city.   But financial concerns regarding the huge expense of the games and the risk of overruns and increasing debt kept a damper on the excitement.

I answered an Angus Reid survey just after a revised last-minute budget was adopted and more money was pledged by governments.   Answering the survey was a very important experience for me because it led me to think deeper about the bid.  I surprised myself because out of 10 questions concerning the benefits of the games for Calgary I answered “yes” to 8 of them but still felt I wanted to vote “no”.  What was I thinking?  As I thought more deeply I became more aware of some aspects of the bid that were influencing my decision.

I realized that there were important issues that were not being addressed in the public conversation. Continue reading

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I’m Looking For Some Good News

I am an optimist.  I have always been interested in good news.  I used to subscribe to a magazine called Ode Magazine that turned into the Intelligent Optimist, then went out of print in 2013.  Good news does not appear to sell well.  The magazine was about the amazing things human beings can accomplish to solve big world problems when they put their minds to it (and can find someone willing to financially back them).

Good News is also the meaning of Gospel.  It is about salvation which I define as entering a better life of freedom, opportunity, justice … all the gospel values.

Lately I have been thinking about how the #me too movement is changing our perspective on human belief and behaviour.  Finally, women will have a say in their own defense and maybe this will bring more protection and less fear of being violated, abused, ignored and limited in their ability to live the lives they want to live and realize their full potential.

I just finished reading a book called Factfulness: Ten Reasons We’re Wrong About the World – and Why Things are Better Than You Think, by Hans Rosling, a Swedish professor in world health.  He shares various data that show that the world is getting better and more people are benefiting from new discoveries and technologies.  There are fewer people living in abject poverty (which he labels Level 1 living), better health care is available around the world and many more people are experiencing some education.  He does not mean that there are no dire problems in the world, just that the trend (shown by data) is toward more people living in better conditions today than ever before.

However, this is not just a feel-good book of statistics.  The book’s purpose is to elaborate on 10 reasons why we do not have a realistic view of the world.  He was surprised to discover that no matter how educated a person was, he/she still incorrectly answered many of 20 questions about world health, wealth, or potential for change. Most people answered with a lower percentage of correct answers than if they had just answered randomly without reading the questions.

Two of his ten reasons are: Continue reading

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Silence is Really Something

It is September and I am ready to get back to a spiritual routine.  Meditation and writing my blog are two parts of my discipline.  In August I was asked to provide leadership for two 7:00 am contemplative services at the church I attend, Hillhurst United in Calgary. In the first service I used the experience of silence as my main focus.  In my blog #13 I reflected on Stephon Alexander’s book, The Jazz of Physics.  One significant discovery that Alexander explained at the end of the book was how matter (something) was created in a vacuum (which we usually think of as empty or nothing).  As I read this, my own mind made a connection with the quality of “silence” in the spiritual practice of meditation.

In several types of meditation we try to get rid of thoughts/inner chatter that are sometimes called “monkey mind”.  I find this a difficult task, but have come to understand the value of developing a way to discipline the mind in meditation. Of course there are also some forms of meditations for other purposes that use the mind to reflect and respond to guidance received in meditation.

Alexander says a vacuum (which we call space) is not empty.  That space between is where everything can happen.  It is the place of possibility.  Often when we refer to silence we mean finding a quiet place or a break in our busy routine, so we can relax, recover and renew ourselves, so we can connect to the Presence and hear the voice of God.  But the silence we seek in meditation or some other spiritual practice is something deeper–the absence of noise within us.  Spiritual teaching says that prayer and meditation are practices that connect us with the divine presence; it is the way we enter into silence where we listen and wait and come to know we are in the presence of love that renews, guides and heals us.  It is really something absolutely positive where no noise can ever penetrate. Nothing in the outside world can disturb it/us when we are rooted in it.  It has infinite depth. It is really something! Continue reading

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The Discovery of the John Griffith String Theory

I just finished reading a book called Convergence: The Idea at the Heart of Science by Peter Watson. It is a history of modern science since 1850, showing how the various scientific disciplines have been converging to influence one other and expound on the evolutionary development of life.  This fascinating book shows how discoveries in physics led to the discovery of the periodic table in chemistry; discoveries in biology (the gene) influenced the growth of politics in Russia and led to new understandings of human behavior in psychology. Watson shows how all the various disciplines in science are contributing to the one story of evolution of the universe and the evolution of human life on Earth.

In physics, the search for a unified theory of everything has been a main goal of research.  In physics research, particle theory led to the emergence of string theory.

“In physics, string theory is a theoretical framework in which the point-like particles of particle physics are replaced by one-dimensional objects called strings.  It describes how these strings propagate through space and interact with each other.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/String_theory

Fortunately, reading this book and some recent personal experiences led to the discovery of my own String Theory:  “Any string, whether it is an electrical cord, garden hose or vacuum cleaner hose, wants to remain stationary and any attempt to move it will elicit a response whereby the string will wrap around, grab hold of, slip into any crevice, crack or opening, or just tangle itself up to impede forward movement”.  This new string theory developed from empirical observation of my own experience and continues to prove itself correct year and year.

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The Jazz of Physics

When science, music and spirituality converge in the search for and the finding of truth I am genuinely moved. I was moved in ways I cannot fully articulate reading Stephon Alexander’s book, The Jazz of Physics, a book about the search for the answer to the question: How did the structure of the universe come to be?

Having a Welsh background (Griffith) music is in my soul.  Music leads me into awareness, feeling and knowing beyond words. For example the statement, “Love changes everything”. Hearing this you may nod your head in agreement.  But when I hear the music of Andrew Lloyd Webber,  “Love, Love changes everything: Hands and faces, Earth and sky,  Love, Love changes everything: How you live and How you die”, (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0Kl2iBders) I feel the truth of that statement in the depth of my being.  I am carried away by its truth. Jazz is a specific kind of music which runs the gamut from smooth jazz with improvisation on a melody to avant-garde that may be characterized by nontraditional, aesthetic innovation and initial unacceptability.  The latter is the music Alexander played and for him it became an analogy for the way discoveries in physics are possible.

Physics is another one of my passions.  Even though I can not do the math, I do see the connections between the spiritual yearning for understanding who I am /why I am here and the reality being explored by physics studying the physical movement of evolution to how we came to be here. In this book Alexander comes very close to bringing these two explorations together. Continue reading

Posted in Evolutionary Thinking, Science and Religion | 4 Comments

Back to the Future When Everything Was Better

This week I have been thinking about Doug Ford’s decision to roll back sex education in Ontario to the 1998 curriculum.  He made this decision because an updated curriculum is not necessary.  We haven’t learned anything new about sexuality, gender identity, cyber-bullying, transgender choices, and how sexual attitudes have a lot to do with personal well being of teenagers.  RIGHT!?

Of course, the real issue here is about Doug Ford’s popularity with his voter base who are mostly “now-focused”, having little vision for the future. They are afraid we are getting too far away from the conservative values of Stephen Harper or Ralph Klein such as: the freedom to do whatever we want, the ability to make obscene amounts of money and ignore social problems, and the power to maintain straight white privilege.  Ford suggests it is better to go back to letting the parents teach their children about sexuality issues.  OK.  But some parents teach intolerance and discrimination because that’s what they were taught by their parents. These are not Canadian values.  Perhaps we need to pass legislation mandating that parents with teenage children take sex education classes so they are up to speed on the rights of children and what we have learned over these past 20 years about respect for gender identity, gay and lesbian people, etc … Continue reading

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Two Books on Science and Religion

I like to learn how other people think.  In the past month I read two books on the relationship between science and religion.  One was from the perspective of Francis Collins, a molecular biologist, The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief; and the second, Darwin, Divinity and the Dance of the Cosmos: An Ecological Christianity, was from the perspective of Bruce Sanguin, a theologian,  and United Church minister. Continue reading

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Happy Are the Poor in Spirit…I Don’t Think So!

I heard an interview-sermon at church a week ago and it triggered a reaction that I have had off and on for quite a long time. The text was the beatitudes Matthew 5: 3-10 which used a newer translation that replaced the word “blessed” with “happy”. The presentation was great, but that one glitch brought back a long conversation in my head. For me, the Gospel is supposed to be leading people to a deeper understanding and connection with God. And when translators “lighten it up” with “common language” it does not do the job. Happy comes from a 14th century word meaning lucky or fortunate. It is related to the word “happenstance” which is a combination of happen and circumstance. We are happy when things go our way, when the circumstances are pleasant and rewarding. Happy is related to our outside world. Blessed is a state of being when one is centered, or I would say, living in relationship with God. Yes, if you look back in the Greek usage it will say fortunate and even happy and the Greek word did refer to the elite, the rich, as blessed. But Jesus used it in a totally different way. Jesus is a transformational thinker and gives us a message that challenges our simplistic or egoistic thinking. It is not the elite who are blessed, it is the poor; it is the hungry and thirsty and those who are in mourning who are blessed. Why is that? Because they are connected to the world in a deeper, more loving way. They have a source of power that does not come from the world around them, rather it comes from the world within them. To bless someone is to empower them. When you bless someone, they are more than happy; they experience a deep sense of joy in being that gives direction to their lives.

As I moved further into my evolutionary Christian journey I thought I was losing my faith, but I was only losing my connection to the God I thought I knew, and was discovering a God who was much different and more connected to my everyday reality. Then I wondered if I could hold on to Jesus because he was integral to my connection with God before God took a different shape and purpose. (The 20 books written in the last 15 years that I have on the theme, “Who is Jesus”, suggest that I am not the only one with this problem. Continue reading

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My Foray Into Truth and Lies

For two weeks I have had the most unsettling thoughts.  Usually I am optimistic and hopeful, but lately I find myself angry and frightened.  And I confess I now see how naive I am about political matters.  I have been reading The Road to Unfreedom by Timothy Snyder.  It brought back to memory a line in a sermon I heard 30 years ago by Fred Craddock, “A lie will get you far, but it won’t get you home.”  It also reminded me of a parable told by Jesus about the wisdom of building your home on a rock foundation, not on sand.  The rock is the truth, sand a lie.  In a storm a rock will hold, but sand will shift, and your home will collapse.  Grace means that a lie might take you far.  You can get away with it, sometimes for a long time.  But in the end if your life is built on lies it will collapse and you will lose everything.  The Road to Unfreedom is about Russia, its collapse and re-emergence as a country built and maintained by lies.

The prologue to the book says that communism in Russia and democracy in the western world were both propagated by what Snyder calls the politics of inevitability.  In this political view, it is the future when life becomes good, and you get there by living by the laws of progress as defined by your particular political structure.

In Russia this collapsed in 1991 and the western world said, “I told you so; it is our system that will inevitably lead to the good life”.  But the collapse of the politics of inevitability did not lead to democracy, but to what Snyder calls the politics of eternity, where a nation sees itself at the centre of a cyclical story of victimhood.  The politics of eternity narrative holds that the enemy is coming and we need to protect ourselves.  Progress is seen as impossible; we must hunker down and be prepared to save our country from outside attacks.  In this scenario politicians manufacture crises and manipulate emotions to hold onto power and distract from their inability or unwillingness to reform.  One strategy to stay in power is to undermine foreign powers that exhibit a better way of life.  Truth is not important; history is used selectively to show that we are the chosen people, and lies are used to demonize others and proclaim our innocence. Continue reading

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Thinking About Justice

On April 7th, an article in the Globe and Mail got me thinking.  The article said shareholders of the Royal Bank were not happy with the “breath taking size of the CEO’s pay package” (last year $13.4 million dollars).  An RBC board member responded that shareholders are getting a bigger dividend now because the bank is making more money.  But that is not the issue. For me it is a justice issue.  The Royal Bank exists in a bigger world.  This response shows the narrow focus of the board (granted this was a share holder meeting).  I wonder who speaks for the customer and the community.  As a shareholder, I regularly get notices of fees being increased.  If those pay packages were not so large I think they could afford to lower some fees for their customers.  But that is not really the issue either.  They operate in a community where poverty persists, low-income housing is hard to come by, and homelessness continues to be a problem.  Enlightened leadership could shift $10 million out of top executive salaries (I believe there are 5 top executives) and put it into a fund to target poverty reduction.  That would benefit the bank in the years to come, and the community right now. Just saying. For example.

This brings me to something I read in a Canadian book called, “I’m Right and You’re an Idiot: The Toxic State of Public Discourse and How to Clean It Up” by James Hoggan (2016). The author interviewed 23 people around the world asking the question, “Why in this age of communication can’t we solve big problems such as poverty, climate change, etc.  In chapter 8, “The Self-Regulating Psychopath”, with Joel Bakan and Noam Chomsky, the conversation is about corporate greed. Continue reading

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Thinking About Easter for the 53rd Time

Three things caught my attention in the past two weeks: Thinking about Easter, a song I heard on the radio, and a play I saw at Alberta Theatre Projects called Constellations.

In my last post I mentioned that the ritual of observing the church year has been important for me in directing my thinking about faith and life issues. This year is no different. Lent has been an intentional reflection time for me, and Easter has always been a challenge. The Christian Church focuses on Easter as being the defining moment for God at work in history and in our lives. While I agree with this I have always had trouble with the way the church interprets this event. Jesus has always been very important in my life and I know him through prayer and scripture. The word of God still speaks to me after all these years, but I have never been able to figure out this teaching about dying for our sins. I know the theology, and can see that the system works when it includes heaven and hell, judgement day and our human nature being corrupted so badly that we need a saviour to help us. But this system no longer describes the real world for me and many others. The God who sacrifices his son so we/I might have eternal life does not fit for me with the love of God I know. It fits for me if I see the Easter event as a life pattern of letting go so new life can emerge (growing up). I have seen this life, death and new life cycle in my life many times.

I spent 53 years of ministry trying to understand Easter and preach it with integrity. I think that Jesus was modeling faithfulness as making life choices which lead to human transformation. To me it works as a metaphor for the way love works in transforming our lives, and it works in the scientific world if we change the word resurrection to emergence (See Nov.3 blog). But as a real physical event that changes history it seems limiting and inconsistent with my idea of the way a loving God is acting in the world today. Having lost the physical constructs of heaven and hell, for me the meaning of Easter is more about the way I live, the choices I make right now. Continue reading

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I Didn’t See That Coming!

Wednesday mornings I am on my way to 7 am meditation at the church I attend. Wednesday, February 14th I knew it was Ash Wednesday and thought I could escape the ashes on the forehead by going to the weekly contemplative service. However, after the welcoming, the worship leader turned it over to the minister who gives us a short reminder that this is the beginning of Lent and it is always good to remember that we are all going to die (someday). Ashes to ashes, dust to dust. I guess this is supposed to get us into a reflective mood.

I have a love – hate relationship with ritual. On the one hand it is boring, words and actions that we say or do that seem to lose their meaning over time and become empty gestures. On the other hand ritual surprises me and orders my life, leading me deeper into the place where God lives. I have always observed the church year. It gives a certain rhythm to my life and a way of celebrating birth, death and transformation as a pattern for life to evolve. Now the invitation is before me. Quickly my mind wonders if I am going to do this, and if I do, what does it mean to me. Continue reading

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“A Lie Will Take You Far, But It Won’t Bring You Home”

This one line in Fred Craddock’s sermon over 30 years ago continues to surface as wisdom for me.  Lies are useful for short-term gain, but eventually the life gained because of a lie falls apart when the truth is discovered.  Lies are destructive because they are not based in reality (perhaps in one person’s or group’s perception of realty). Even though we know this, we lie anyway to get out of a jam, to save face, or because we think what we are saying isn’t important (little white lies).  Most of us lie everyday when we say “fine” when asked how we are.  It is socially acceptable, more comfortable and who really cares anyway (we think to ourselves).  Yet, it does matter.  Lies take us farther and farther away from our own truth that gets neglected, buried and finally out of touch, even to ourselves. Once we are out of touch with the foundation of our life, we make it up as we go along — skimming on the surface of things, relationships and events, moving from one thing to the next.  Making money, buying new technology, addictions to our phones and social media all keep us on the surface and out of touch with the foundation of life where values determine meaning and purpose. Continue reading

Posted in Evolutionary Thinking, Spirituality | 3 Comments

Christmas Time Already: Where’s the Excitement?

When I first began my ministry in 1969, the Christmas story was a literal story about the wonder and miracle of God’s love, the divine coming to us in human form that we might experience the gift of God’s grace welcoming us into his family. God showing us the way home so we would not be lost.  We had our pageants and our decorations.  There were concerts, gifts and excitement.  Then as scholarly exploration of biblical texts became common knowledge, we came to understand that the Christmas story was really several stories and none of them necessarily factually accurate.  The word “myth” was heard more; meaning the story was perhaps not factually true but was presenting an eternal truth in a human story.

That seemed to save the day and as a minister I searched for ways to highlight the eternal truths of God’s love and what better way than in the birth of baby.  Continue reading

Posted in Evolutionary Thinking, Spirituality | 12 Comments

Amazing Grace in an Age of Entitlement

Two weeks ago I started thinking about the parable/story of the wise and foolish bridesmaids (Mathew 25:1-13) which was the basis of a sermon on November 12. The minister commented that it was a difficult passage – one you must live with to get what Jesus was saying. It is not obvious and it is challenging. The minister wrestled with how a loving God could close a door to anyone and why people chosen to be bridesmaids would not share their lamp oil with the less fortunate who were running out of oil. I have been a preacher for 35 years and a minister for 49, and here I am once again wrestling with this scripture for the past two weeks.

The story is not about sharing; it is about being prepared. Being prepared for what? Jesus introduces the story as being about being prepared to enter the Kingdom of God. What does he mean by “Kingdom of God”? This is where evolutionary thinking kicks in for me. This reading comes at the end of Jesus’ ministry and the church places it on the cusp of the season of Advent when we begin again to think about celebrating the entry of Jesus into our lives. I think Jesus is talking about the Kingdom of God as life blessed by peace, hope, joy, and love – four important themes in Jesus’ teaching which the church has chosen for the four weeks of advent. An evolutionary perspective recognizes that scripture is about how we live in a complex matrix of life, gifts and opportunities that enable us to grow and evolve. Evolutionary theology does not see Jesus as the one who swoops in at the last minute and makes everything okay. Rather, Jesus is a partner in creation who works with us to make an uncertain future a blessing rather than a disaster. The truth we do not want to believe is that this depends on us, not Jesus. And that means if we are not prepared (don’t have enough oil for the task) when we are called to take the bridegroom to the party, we will lose the opportunity and be shut out. We will miss our opportunity to be part of creation where we experience peace, hope, joy and love. No one can give me their oil; I have to have my own source and I have to have some in reserve for when it is needed. Continue reading

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What Has Love Got to Do With It?

Fortunately, like never before in history, this generation has at its disposal new and wonderful evidence from science, confirming the presence and power of what many of us would call a Very Insistent Love at the heart of all creation. Richard Rohr, Center for Action and Contemplation daily blog, 10/22/17, https://cac.org/sign-up/

My ministry has been all about love. God is love. The great commandment to love God, neighbour, and self is a central teaching of Christianity. Vince raised a significant question: Is there a place for a personal, interventionist God in evolutionary thinking? I suddenly realized that I hadn’t mentioned love when talking about the foundation of the universe.

I have on my shelf 29 books about love. Recent books! What is going on here? What is going on here is my continuing quest to understand love as the dynamic, creative power of the universe that is also the motivating force of my personal life. Steve McIntosh, in his book, Evolution’s Purpose, calls it the evolutionary impulse. I want to not only know more about this force, I want to live love and understand more about why I don’t.

In his October 24, 2017 CAC blog, Richard Rohr says, “Anybody who has paid any attention to their inner life or read any history books surely recognizes that life and love are always cumulative, diffusive, and expanding. Perhaps it is this change that we fear. For some reason, we seem to think that admitting such love dynamism, and in fact cooperating with it (see Romans 8:28) is going to compromise our eternal, unchanging notion of God. It’s just the opposite, I think. If our God is both incarnate and implanted, both Christ and Holy Spirit, then an unfolding inner dynamism in all creation is not only certain, but also moving in a positive direction with a divine goal that is always set before us.” I cite this blog because it represents an evolutionary perspective on the trinity (God as infinite, intimate and inner) and love being the directing force of evolution.

Ken Wilber, in his EnlightenNext article, issue 47, p 48, says more vehemently, “There is no way in hell that the universe went from atoms to Shakespeare out of random stabs. This is an extraordinarily driven process.”

Physical science disciplines do not use the word love. Brian Swimm says scientists began learning about the physical universe to discover more about how God creates, and have ended up actually studying the processes that gave birth to the universe. I believe science is talking about the power of love when it says there is an intimate connection between all things in the universe. This connective energy draws us together, holds us together, and guides our interactions in such a way that new life emerges. Emergence, not survival of the fittest, is the goal of evolution. The universe is held together by gravitational interaction. In my opinion, a fancy word for love.

In EnlightenNext, issue 47, Swimm makes three points: 1) The universe is not a place, it is a story about an irreversible sequence of emergent events. 2) Love or ‘homeostasis’ is the way the universe holds its new creation together. 3) Things don’t just come and go, they build on each other and new possibilities emerge.

Continue reading

Posted in Evolutionary Thinking, Spirituality | 2 Comments

Building Blocks of Evolutionary Christianity

After my first post last April, several recipients let me know there was some difficulty with the system that allowed people to respond.  When you arrive at the home page, if you click on the blog title or go to “Recent Posts” in the right hand column and click the desired post you will be taken to the actual blog page and once there you will be able to leave a comment or click to follow the blog.

Then summer arrived and passed into fall and I have been stalled.  I realized that this was going to be more complicated than just posting what I was thinking.  I decided that I needed to show how my life and my thinking are rooted in an Evolutionary Christianity and give some background on what the perspective of Evolutionary Christianity is.

The job I took on was beginning to feel very daunting and I was unsure where to start.  This was a place that felt very familiar to me.  I had been here several times in my personal and vocational life.  In my ministry when I was faced with a decision that could change the course of my life, my strategy was to try to figure it all out before I moved ahead.  My decision to come to Canada to serve a Moravian Church in Calgary, my decision to give up my U.S. Citizenship and become a Canadian citizen, my decision to move from the Moravian Church to the United Church of Canada and, last but not least, my decision to begin a community ministry called Spiritual Directions were a just a few of these moments.   Each time I spent time in prayer and reflection to determine if this really was a “call” for me. But, even when I did believe it was a call I would still spend time trying to figure out all the details until finally I got the message:  “Don’t try to figure it all out, just take the next step.  If you believe this new direction is really a call, just say yes and begin”.  The decision for me is often about trust and moving ahead in faith.

So…. with a new burst of energy and commitment I begin again!

Continue reading

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A Short Reflection on How I Got Here

On August 15, 1943, two years before the end of World War II, I was born into the beginning of an extended time of exceptional opportunity, growth, change, affluence, world leadership and awakening to many social injustices in the United States. Another gift to me was my family’s participation in the Moravian Church which provided a context where I learned about the love of God and the importance of a community where social connections and personal and spiritual growth were encouraged.  I credit the ethos of the Moravian church, with its emphasis on education, music and community development with giving me a solid foundation for my life.  I sometimes say I drifted into ministry in my early years, but I also believe I was called into ministry. I graduated from Moravian College and finally from Moravian Theological Seminary in 1969.

A second influence on my young self was my love of science and science fiction. I was an avid science fiction reader as a teen, and loved speculating about space travel, possible worlds, alien races, and the interaction of humans with the universe.   At age 26 when the first moon landing happened I had just graduated from Moravian Theological Seminary and was also newly married.

In seminary I was introduced to process theology which gave me a good foundation for loving the journey more than the destination.  Process Theology built on my undergraduate philosophy degree which had grounded me in existentialism and phenomenology, both of which focused on the sacredness of the “now” moment.

I also found exciting expressions/explorations of life in the avant-garde theatre of Samuel Beckett (Waiting for Godot), Eugene Ionesco (The Bald Soprano, Rhinoceros and Other Plays), the beatnik writings of Jack Kerouac (On the Road) and the poetry of Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Allen Ginsberg.

Finally, it was in the social unrest of the Viet Nam War and the Civil Rights Movement where I found my social conscience. This sparked in me a recognition that change and unrest is at the centre of life.  My desire for Truth, what is real and what is possible, would be a continuing exploration throughout my life.

In my ministry I began with a Journey Theology that morphed into a Liberation Theology and has landed in an Evolutionary Theology.  It’s not that a new perspective replaced the former one.  For me, the next step always incorporated and expanded my previous understanding of God at work in the world.

The discipline of science developed exponentially in knowledge and influence in my lifetime, and became the major influence in defining our understanding of life in the twentieth century. The church struggled to adjust to the challenges posed especially by physics and biology to its own world view and held science at arm’s length, seeing its findings as a threat to the Christian faith.  Theologians struggled to find ways of accommodating scientific findings with the Gospel message.  But that was just a necessary stage preparing us to enter the paradigm shift presently taking place.  This shift is enabling us to see how science and religion can inform each other to establish a new basis for our understanding of the reality/world we live in.  I am very excited by the possibilities that the union of these disciplines will open up to us as a human species. I realize this is what some fear.  It is what I cherish.

I retired in June 2015 after 30 years of active pastoral ministry and 16 years of teaching and providing spiritual direction.  Yet my mind has not retired and my life long seeking for Truth continues. I am a firm believer in the value of community to help us find The Way, The Truth and The Life.  For me I seldom find the whole Truth on my own.  I grab a tail if it, I get a glimpse, a paragraph here and there that grounds itself in my experience and begins a transformation in me and the way I live.

I have procrastinated long enough and am finally committing to this blog as a way of sharing my thoughts and receiving feedback.  What Was I Thinking — Reflections of an Evolutionary Christian Pilgrim will share thoughts from my reading, conversations, moments of contemplation and my desire to live faithfully in this changing world. My blog will not necessarily be about religion; often it will be about my attempts to express my faith in some action, explore some new understanding or just share what I am discovering on this wonder-full journey I am still on after all these years.

I am excited to share my musings and my explorations of how faith informs my life and I hope you will join me on my journey and provide companionship and feedback for a lively conversation.

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